Changes at the library

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The Elder library is one of the school’s most critical buildings.

Whether it’s your freshman year and you need to find a novel for Mr. Alig, you’re a sophomore and have a huge geometry assignment due after lunch, or you’re a senior just wanting to find a nice place to read, the library has everything you need. What’s exciting to hear, is that there are new changes coming to the classic place.

If you’ve been by the area lately, you might have noticed a multitude of different desks sitting around. They are of different colors, sizes, styles, and really give the room an exciting energy. According to librarian Mrs. Kelley, these various desks are serving as a sample for teachers to decide what new desks they think should be in classes in the future. “The school is getting new desks, and we’re giving teachers and students some idea of what might come.”

However, there are much bigger changes happening at the library next year. Through Mrs. Kelley and Ms. Williams-Mitchell’s explanation, it seems that almost everything in the library will see rapid change and rearrangement. “We’re pretty much completely re-doing everything. The library was built almost twenty years ago, and it needs an update.” Mrs. Kelley details some part of the plan, indicating that the main structures of the library will be completely moved around, with new bookshelves and desks being added. “Also, the MakerBot area (the 3D printers) is getting its own room with possibly new facilities, but those are pretty expensive.” The MakerBot stations are definitely a favorite of the student body, offering its users the power to print whatever object they can think of, including complex puzzles, figurines, and even an anatomically correct model hand.

The current MakerBot station.

Among the most excited staff was Mr. Nohle: “After all these years at Elder, I’m finally getting out of that dusty server room!” The computer expert’s excitement was palpable as he explained how he and Mr. Fuell would be getting their own office space in the building, giving them more room and resources to do their work.

Another exciting byproduct of the renovations, though, is what the librarians are calling “Freebie Fridays.” “So basically, we need to get rid of all these,” says Mrs. Williams-Mitchell as she gestures to an enormous stack of antique books. “We hate to part with any books, but as we get more and more, its impossible to store them all.” The stack of soon-to-be free books include classic novels and antique sports books, one detailing the history of the now defunct Boston Braves.

Mitch Bareswilt enjoying his favorite corner on campus.

These changes look to be great additions to the Elder library; however, they do come at a cost. According to Mrs. Kelley, the classic couch, which, according to Junior Mitch Bareswilt, is the “comfiest piece of furniture I’ve ever had the privilege to sit in,” will be removed. Although it will be replaced by more couches, it is a terrible hit to the hundreds of students who enjoyed the sofa for their many years at Elder.

Even with the tragic loss, this radical renovation to the library will bring a new, much needed update to an important Elder facility.